Grain-Free Matzo

For years my friends, family, and readers have been asking me to create a grain-free matzo recipe. This year, instead of throwing my paleo matzo together the day of our Seder, I took time during the last few weeks to work on creating a gluten-free matzo recipe.

As you can imagine, my house has become a veritable paleo matzo factory with batch after batch of matzo spread out all over my kitchen counters.

Matzo is an interesting food. Most Jews, including myself will tell you that we don’t really like the taste of matzo. It’s dry and starchy, and for the most part completely lacking in flavor. On the other hand, matzo is an incredible vehicle for a fabulous part of the Seder, the Hillel Sandwich, which is matzo with charoset and maror (horseradish).

Grain-Free Matzo

Ingredients
Serves:
2
Print Recipe
Instructions
  1. In a food processor combine almond flour, coconut flour, and salt
  2. Pulse in egg, olive oil, and water
  3. Divide dough into 2 pieces
  4. Roll out dough between 2 pieces of parchment paper to 1/16-inch thickness
  5. Remove top piece of parchment paper
  6. Transfer matzo to a baking sheet
  7. Prick holes in matzo using a fork
  8. Bake at 350°F for 10-13 minutes, watching very closely
  9. Cool for 2 hours
  10. Serve

Thankfully, my matzo is fairly tasty. Unfortunately, since it has good taste, texture and flavor, my paleo matzo does not taste exactly like the real thing –i.e., grain-based matzo. Because of this I recommend that you do what our family does each Passover –buy gluten-free matzo for those on a gluten-free diet, and make this grain-free matzo for folks that are strictly grain-free (like myself) or following a Paleo diet.

What is matzo? Referred to as matzoh, matza, or matzah, and known as “the bread of affliction,” matzo is unleavened bread typically made of wheat flour and water. It is traditionally eaten by Jews during the Passover holiday when eating chametz (wheat products that are leavened) is not permitted.

I’m often asked, is matzo gluten-free? Well, the answer is no. Real matzo is made of wheat, something I have not eaten since 1998, when I was diagnosed with celiac disease. Real matzo would make me very sick if I consumed it. I’m also frequently asked what I use in place of matzo meal during Pesach. That is easy to answer –almond flour is my matzo meal and because of this all of my recipes are kosher for Passover.

If you’re looking for a Paleo Passover menu, you’re in luck. If you need healthy Paleo Passover recipe ideas for topping this homemade matzo, try the ones below!


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paleo cooking from elana's pantryGluten-Free Almond Flour Cookbook


Comments

97 responses to “Grain-Free Matzo”

  1. I was wondering every on i make Passover rolls with matzah meal i have to eat low carb can I make my Passover rolls with almond flour and if so how can it be done
    Any suggestions.

    Have a Wonderful Passover.
    Thanks in advance
    Deborah

  2. Thanks for this especially with four days till Passover! Made this today and LOVED it. Thanks !! I’ll be serving it at Saturday Seder that I’m hosting .. Finally great home made Matzo that I can eat.

  3. Elena,

    My mom can’t eat coconut, is there something else I can use instead of coconut flour? I love the recipes I have tried so far and Passover is coming.

    Dawn

    • Dawn, thanks for your comment! I haven’t tried that so not sure. I’m so happy to hear that you love the recipes on my site :-)

  4. Thank you so much for this recipe. It was great to have this on Passover. My husband, who hates matzah, said that this was not like matzah because it tastes great. My daughter in law suggested that I make this recipe as every day crackers. I’ve started doing that and my family has enjoyed these crackers so much. I score the rolled out dough into squares with a knife before baking. Yesterday I sprinkled “everything but the bagel” seasoning on a small portion of the crackers before baking. I’m going to have to try these with a little shmear of cream cheese and some lox on top. Thank you again.

  5. Although this recipe is great for those that are on the diet. One does not fulfill the commandment of eating Matzah on Passover night at the seder, unless the matzah is made from one the 5 GRAiNS . The five grains are wheat, barley, oat, rye and spelt. For more information check out chabad.org.

    • Jewish Mom, thanks so much for your input! Given that I am allergic to all grains, this is a nice supplement for me and our Rabbi said it was ok given my health condition :-)

  6. Hi Elena!

    I’ve been sticking to a ketogenic diet, which is how I came across this recipe. I’d planned to make it for Passover, but I never got around to it. I tried it tonight, and WOW. It’s delicious! I sprinkled one with hemp hearts and the other with chia seeds. I’m going to eat all of it tonight!

    I’m trying to figure out how your fork holes look so deep. And the nice square shape of your matzo… well, I’ll keep working on that. :-) Thank you so much for posting this.

    • Michele, I use a fork and press firmly to make the holes. I use a pizza cutter to cut the borders so neatly. I’m so glad to hear this was WOW! We love it too :-)

  7. Elana,
    I was so pleased to find your webpage and recipes. I am celiac also and have suffered through the card board taste of oat matzah for many years…awful! This year my doctor recommended I start the SCD food plan, and I found your matzah recipe. It was delicious. I also made the matzah ball recipe and they were also tasty, and my family thought so too. I was thrilled to be able to enjoy the Passover seder this year and partake in the Mitzvoth of the Hillel cracker. I’m looking forward to trying many more recipes. Pesach Semach!
    Thank you so much,
    Shellie

    • Shellie, it’s so nice to meet you here and I’m glad we are on this healing path together. Thanks for letting me know the matzah was delicious! Chag Sameach!

    • Hi Elana,
      I now have all three of your cookbooks and found your recipes for the skillet apple pie, which calls for arrowroot powder as a thickener. I’m on the SCD and arrowroot is not allowed. Is there a substitute you suggest? Will it come out ok if I just omit the arrowroot?
      Thanks,
      Shellie

      • Shellie, I’m so glad to hear you are enjoying my books! You can make that recipe without the arrowroot, it will just be a little watery since it won’t have the thickener :-)

  8. I notice all you use is celtic salt as I haven’t found any do you think this recipe will be ok with sea salt?

    • Mara, in order to find celtic sea salt, simply click the green text in the ingredients portion of the recipe that says, “celtic sea salt.” :-)

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Recipes » Snacks » Grain-Free Matzo