ginger licorice herbs

Ginger Licorice Tea

Warm and healing ginger licorice root tea for colds and adrenal health.

This Ayurvedic recipe for Ginger Licorice Tea is a life saver, or least a throat saver.

When it gets cold outside and our throats begin to get a bit scratchy, I put up a pot of ginger licorice tea. Sweet and spicy, the boys love it on a cold day. The last time they went up skiing, they asked me to put some in a thermos for them.

 

Ginger Licorice Tea
Serves: 8
 
Ingredients
  • 2 quarts water
  • ¼ cup licorice root
  • 1 finger's length fresh ginger, sliced
Instructions
  1. Fill a pot with 2 quarts of water
  2. Add the licorice root and fresh ginger
  3. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes
  4. Pour tea through a small mesh strainer piping hot into mugs and serve (thanks Cora!)
 

Please note: leave skin on ginger for less work and more flavor.

According to The Way of Herbs, by Michael Tierra, ginger is of great benefit to the stomach and may be taken alone or with other herbs to enhance its effectiveness. Licorice is good for adrenal insufficiency (although large doses will exacerbate high blood pressure) and is very soothing for lungs and digestion. We use it in our house to soothe a cold or sore throat. Or to calm down an upset tummy.

Comments

  1. says

    Thank you. Just happen to have the ingredients. Sounds good anytime for stomach settling. I used to eat licorice and feel better, before I knew why. I did the same with honey when I was on chemo it elevated me then learned it was a mood elevator along with so much more.

  2. Joanne says

    What I like about your recipes beyond the fact they are delicious is the simplicity no need to print, just jot down the recipe on already used paper; saving paper! This is the ideal tea for cold, rainy pacific northwest dwellers.

  3. says

    Is this root from a licorice fern or another plant? My son goes to an outdoor school and they recommend chewing on the licorice fern root for coughs… just wondering if it is the same thing.

  4. Linda says

    This is exactly what I was looking for today. It actually tastes really good, which was a surprise since I don’t tend to either flavor. The Licorice root was a challenge to find, Whole foods isn’t carrying it aside for a few boxed teas. Looks like the best option is your link on amazon if you can plan ahead. I did improvise with the tea bags and fresh ginger. Thanks as always!

  5. Dina says

    Just picked up the Licorice root…
    I did not realize this can not be used by a woman that is pregnant
    I had already sent this recipe to my daughter who is expecting…I hope she is in no hurry to get this in hopes to help her terrible morning sickness…

    I love all that you do, I would like to request that there be mention that a pregnant woman should not drink this…

    Thank you!!!

  6. Gretchen Ingram says

    I love your web-site! The information is great and I love reading the questions and the answers. You can really learn a lot from people! Thanks again!! Gretchen

  7. Lorraine says

    Do you cut off the tough outer skin of the ginger? By the time I am done with this, the amount of ginger is so small!

  8. SHAWNEE says

    Drinking more than a cup of licorice tea may affect cortisol levels in a bad way. Licorice tea contains glycyrrhetinic acid which inhibits a renal enzyme called 11?eta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 which converts biologically active cortisol to inactive cortisone. The glycyrrhetinic acid in licorice tea can inhibit renal 11?-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 ( HSD11B2) which causes cortisol levels to go up. This in turn can cause the immune system to plummet as well as cause weight gain issues and a number of other symptoms related to elevated cortisol levels.

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