Eggnog

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Ingredients
Instructions
Nutrition

Just the other day, my children and I were discussing the etymology (i.e., derivation) of the word “eggnog.” According to Wikipedia, the drink may have originated in England, and it is possible that it developed from a drink called “posset,” a beverage made of hot milk. Eggnog’s second syllable, “nog,” seems to have come from the word “noggin” which is from 16th century English and appears to mean “small cup or mug.”

Low-Carb Eggnog Recipe

Based on Alton Brown’s eggnog recipe, my Low-Carb Eggnog is very low in sugar and high in fat which makes it the perfect treat if you’re following a Keto Diet during the holidays. Yes! It’s keto eggnog!

Vegan Eggnog Recipe

This recipe contains raw eggs. For me that is not a problem, I’ve been feasting on raw eggs since I was a child, when I made the toll house cookie recipe almost every day after school while my Mom was at work. I haven’t ever had an issue with raw eggs, in fact, sometimes I wonder if I tolerate raw eggs better than cooked eggs. If you are concerned check out my  Vegan Eggnog recipe! Yes, it’s an egg-free, dairy-free eggnog.

Ingredients
Serves:
2-3
Print Recipe
Instructions
  1. In a food processor, combine egg yolks, heavy cream, and water
  2. Process for 45 seconds, then pulse in honey, nutmeg, and vanilla stevia
  3. Pulse in salt if using
  4. Using a hand blender and a pint mason jar whip egg whites to stiff peak
  5. Mix whites into eggnog mixture with 3 quick pulses
  6. Chill and serve

Very Low-Carb Diet

I’ve been eating an extremely low-sugar diet since June 3, 2014. Yes, I remember the exact date that I gave up bananas, apples, mangoes, and other sweet fruits and just about every single one of my dessert recipes. I’m feeling much better which is good since my health suffered after the incidents described in my When Things Fall Apart post. Although I’ve been in ketosis (I measure whether I’m in or out using an incredible breath monitor from Ketonix), I haven’t been counting carbs, just eliminating them wherever possible.

Nutrition Information

As you all know, I don’t like turning eating into a mathematical exercise! That’s why I don’t use nutrition information, I just eat healthy and low-carb. If you need nutrition information, hop on over to myfitnesspal.com. I discuss this subject a bit more in a post called Nutrition Information.

Tips for How to Make Homemade Eggnog

If you want to make this Eggnog bright yellow, add ⅛ teaspoon of turmeric. The color is stunning and turmeric is a super spice that has numerous health benefits including detoxification of the liver. The batch I made for the photograph above does not have tumeric in it. The froth in the eggnog in the photo is from the foamy egg whites that have risen to the top.

I have made this eggnog recipe both with and without salt. There is no denying that I am a salt-a-holic (which works really well for me given that my blood pressure is low). I think it tastes much better with salt, you might find though, that you prefer this eggnog without salt. Enjoy!

Nutrition
There is no Nutrition Label for this recipe yet.

Comments

37 responses to “Eggnog”

  1. Hi Elana, caught part of your interview with Faith Middleton on her Connecticut Public Radio “The Food Schmooze” program today. Glad to see that you are getting the word out about paleo/primal eating, and it reminded me to check out your yummy recipes.

  2. One drawback to eating raw eggs is it depletes biotin. However, unless you’re Rocky Balboa and eat them all the time you probably don’t have to worry if it’s occasional. :)
    Love your site. You have made the world a better place for those who need your recipes. I’m in the natural health field and tell all my clients about your website and books. You are a true gift!

  3. We have the ketonix as well! We don’t count carbs but essentially are eating a keto diet and test consistently with ketones. It’s a great device, feel the best I have in years and never count calories yet maintain the same weight. We love your recipes and they fit wonderfully into our diet. Cannot wait to try the egg nog too!

  4. A friend and I were just discussing making a primal egg nog! I can’t wait to try this! I don’t tolerate the taste of stevia. Anyone know if I can just leave it out? Maybe add in some vanilla extract?

    • As I stated above, we normally make the cooked nog, but will try this. In the very distant past, as a teen, we would have the raw egg nog, but wouldn’t use stevia. I don’t know that you necessarily need sweetener, but perhaps you could try honey, Moon fruit, or even puree two or more full dates in the blender with this? I prefer dates, followed by coconut sugar.

    • I was just wondering the same thing. Stevia tastes absolutely terrible to me! I think I’ll try vanilla extract. If I had any vanilla beans I think I’d try that…

  5. Could I please ask you if you feel safe using raw eggs? If I had somewhere local, a really well established family farm where I could buy eggs, I would feel so much more confident in not making us sick. Store bought tends to make me feel uneasy.

    Thank you for all you share here. You are the go-to angel on the Internet when I need recipes and ideas.

    Sue

    • I would never buy this, but I did see that you can buy pasteurized eggs now…..don’t know if this info help. I’ve seen them at both Sprouts and Whole Foods.(I notice them because I thought they were pastured eggs….!)

    • We eat chickens from our own eggs. The likelihood of salmonella is exponentially greater with factory-raised eggs. I am not saying this to justify eating them raw–I usually don’t, and will try this recipe but our family generally prefers the thick, custard-style eggnog. I believe it is definitely your call, but you can look it up for more information before choosing. :)

    • I eat raw eggs almost daily either in homemade mayo or smoothies and the yolks for Caesar dressing. Never a problem with pastured eggs.

    • Sue, I have been eating raw eggs, especially raw egg yolks, up to 6 per day for years and never had a problems. I buy organic eggs, but I wouldn’t hesitate to eat regular store eggs either. I know people who eat up to a couple of dozen raw eggs a day.

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