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Paleo Passover Recipes

Paleo recipes take your gluten free seder to the next level of healthiness.

Although I’ve been grain free since 2001, this will be our first strictly Paleo Passover seder. I’m sharing my seder menu since the requests for Paleo Passover recipes are coming in a mile a minute.

Many of these gluten free Passover recipes are traditional Jewish fare and can be used for other Jewish holidays as well –think Squash Pie, which I serve as kugel.

I hope this menu will make the combination of being Jewish and Paleo a whole lot easier for y’all. If you’re not Jewish, feel free to enjoy the Paleo diet recipes below, some of which are all time favorites of mine, such as the Paleo Matzo Ball Soup.

You’ll notice the stark absence of matza from this menu. That’s because I am still working on a gluten free Paleo matza recipe –I have been for years. And the matza I throw together is hardly worthy of public consumption. I make a couple of pieces for myself and purchase organic gluten free matza for the rest of my family at the health food store (you can also find it online).

What are some of your favorite gluten free/Paleo recipes that you will be making for Passover this year?


posted on April 2, 2012

  1. j3nn @ j3nn.net

    The whole menu sounds delicious anytime of year!

  2. Christine

    looks like a great line-up; simple, elegant and oh so delicious!

  3. Judy

    Just got the most awesome almond flour matzoh from online http://www.digestivewellness.com/itempage-p3625-24-36-1814.html
    too good to be true, they’re addictive!

  4. CJ - Food Stories Blog @ foodstoriesblog.com

    Can’t wait to see the paleo coconut macaroons, Elena!

  5. Carol Baldridge

    I am seriously considering an appetizer that is a slice of roasted/baked eggplant with a garlic/parsley/walnut topping.

    I know that I will be making meringues and macaroons and a sponge cake. I am not on a paleo diet but I am gluten free.

  6. Mechal Sobel

    The following is a wonderful Spanish-Jewish Passover cake that I make all year long. I use sugar, but clearly you can substitute other sweeteners. [Adapted from Claudia Rodan, The Book of Jewish Food, 1996, 599]
    2 organic oranges
    6 eggs
    1 cup sugar
    1 teaspoon baking powder or 1 teaspoon baking soda
    2 and a 1/2 cups almond flour
    1/2 teaspoon salt

    Wash oranges and boil them for two and a half hours, allow to cool
    Beat eggs with sugar
    Add baking powder or soda, almond flour and salt, and mix
    Cut the cooled oranges in half, remove seeds, puree in food processor
    Mix with the egg and almond mixture
    Pour into a 9 x 12 inch oiled pan
    Bake about 40 minutes in a 375 degree F. oven

    • HomeCookedHealthy @ homecookedhealthy.com

      Sounds like an interesting recipe. Do you add any type of frosting to this? Would love to try with an orange flavored stevia and dates to sweeten.

    • Anna Rose

      This cake sounds very similar to the Dundee cake I make, same steps, but add golden raisins, regular raisins, currants, almond paste, and slivered almonds.
      6 oz organic butter (vegan if you’d like)
      6 oz castor sugar (or extra fine)
      3 eggs
      9 oz almond flour
      1/2 tsp baking powder
      6 oz sultanas (golden raisins)
      3 oz currants
      3 oz raisins
      either 3 oz lemon/orange peel mix or juice of 2 oranges and 1 lemon
      1 oz ground almonds or almond paste
      3 oz slivered almonds

      Cream butter and sugar. Add the eggs one at a time and beat well. Add the dry ingredients, prepared fruit, ground almonds (or paste), and slivered almonds. If too thick, add a little water, or almond milk to make dropping consistency. Put in sprayed and almond floured 8-inch cake pan, then, if you wish, place halved almonds on top to make a pattern. Bake at 350 degrees for 30-45 minutes to doneness. If seeming to burn, put some foil edges around the top. Remove afterward, letting the cake cool for about 10 minutes. Serve and enjoy!

    • Pam

      Elana has a similar recipe that I tried and is excellent!! :) It’s her Starbucks Orange Cake… it is so good I ate almost the whole thing myself! :)

  7. Melissa

    This Paleo gentile loves some Jewish Holiday fare! YUM! One of my best friends during my teenage years was Jewish. During Chanukkah our families would have such a latke fest together! It was amazing…one time it landed on Christmas Eve…but my whole Christian family came anyway, played dreidel and ate and ate and ate. Can’t wait to try these recipes! Thanks!

  8. Lorri Lewis

    Yesterday, I hacked 2 recipes from the Elana’s Almond Flour cookbook which was a great success. Had a bit too much mushroom pate’ to fit into the container so I spread it on a Cheddar Almond Flatbread square — that was heavenly. Next dairy meal for guests will include that as an appetizer,

    Cheddar Almond Flat Bread
    1 1/2 cups almond flour
    1/2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
    1/4 tsp baking soda
    1 egg
    1 tblsp olive oil

    Mix dry ingredients in a bowl. Mix wet ingredients in another bowl. Mix wet into dry with a fork until a dough forms. Pat into an 8″X10″ rectangle on a piece of parchment paper on a baking sheet
    . Bake 350 degrees for about 20 minutes until it starts to color.
    Easy Pesach Gluten Free
    Dairy

  9. Thank you and Bless you for this! Perfect timing!! I need these! Now, I need to get motivated to get to the store…

  10. Mearced

    Thank you so much for posting this. So very helpful to those who desire to celebrate but always feel limited by their diet. I’ve forwarded your link to two other households who are paleo and celebrate passover. Thanks again!!!

  11. Alison

    do you have a recipe for matzo brei?

  12. Iris

    Fantastic! I’m also planning to make a sugar-free version of your torte reciple, using cacao butter, creamed coconut, and stevia for the frosting (unless the macaroon recipe looks even more appealing).

  13. Baden @ gapsguide.com

    Elana: I just wanted to say thanks so much for creating a post specific to Judaism! I’m always so happy to see the nuances of various regions, cultures and religions represented in the GAPS/Paleo/GF/etc world. So thanks for this. I’ve moments ago amended my ‘GAPS Easter post’ to (a) reference Passover in the title, (b) reference and link to this post within it, and (c) invite folks with other traditions to add their tips for their respective feasts and celebrations. Yeah, diversity!

  14. Can’t wait for the macaroon recipe!

  15. Anastasia@healthymamainfo.com @ healthymamainfo.com

    Haven’t had Matzo ball soup in years, thanks for reminding!

  16. Lisa

    I’m always up for a new holiday recipe to try!
    I gave up making chopped liver and gefilte fish, years ago, because I was really the only one interested (not to mention the exorbitant cost of making gefilte). Now I pick up a smidgen of chopped liver at the deli, when the craving strikes. My mom always made it with beef liver, and a ratio of 4 hard boiled eggs and 2 sauteed onions for each pound of meat (and, of course, enough schmaltz..[rendered chicken fat].. to bind. Not healthy for everyday, but YUM!
    My daughter is gluten sensitive, so I’ll add some of your matzoh balls to the pot this year. My son also loves the almond paste macaroons (NOT marzipan)I make every year, which just happen to be gluten free. There’s a recipe on the back of the label. I make them small and “glue” them together with melted dark chocolate. You could also put jam in the middle and then dip them.
    I am also “required” to make a sweet potato casserole (mash, after baking and scooping, with just a smidge of OJ, butter, cinnamon, salt) and top it with Passover marshmallows! I especially like it with the toasted coconut ones.

    I’ve gotten a number of very good recipes from ‘The New York Times Passover Cookbook.” One is a delicious chicken breast recipe with olives and tomatoes. A lot of good stuff for anytime.
    I also make a sort of tzimmes casserole, but I don’t remember if it’s in that book, or Joan Nathan’s It’s a combo of sweet potatoes, carrots, prunes (I add dried apricots too),and matzoh meal; you could easily sub almond flour there.

    By the way, I have always grated fresh horseradish for the seder. :)

    I’m not sure I really understand (or agree with) the reasoning behind the Paleo diet, but it makes for interesting reading. I know you have some health issues. Has the omission of grain made a significant difference in how you feel? I have some chronic digestive issues as a result of radiation treatment and surgery for colon cancer. The radiation damage was extensive. I would certainly try any rational diet that might help with my issues.

    Happy Passover!

  17. Lisa

    OMG…I forgot the most important thing My kids practically live on my charoset and matzo during Passover! I make the apple version, in the processor. It’s 2 or 3 parts apple to each part walnuts, a little cinnamon, some of the sweet Passover wine (to moisten), and a bit of honey, if needed.

  18. I love how you and your whole family can enjoy food from the same diet and how you made it work so wonderfully. Not all mothers can make that work! Came across one lady once who made four different dishes each meal, 3 different for each child and one for her and her husband, just to make everyone happy….Puh!
    Have a great easter. Emilia

  19. looks wonderful, as usual!!
    thanks,
    Holly

  20. I adore your blog!!! This menu you is fabulous!! I was wondering about kneidelach!! Thanks for the recipe. Pesach is the paleo chag I think! Chag sameach to you and your family. Amy

  21. Raquel of Galilee

    Happy Passover, Elana! Amazing how in all of your preparations for this holiday, you still make time for US, your online followers.

    There is a thought that seder night (only one here in Israel), you may consider to eat a main course that is not roasted (like the ‘kor-ban Pesach’). I made an amazing stew last year for seder and the family asked me to make it again. Recipe for 4. Just multiply.

    BEEF and ARTICHOKE STEW
    1 kg (2.2 lbs) shoulder cut of beef, cut in cubes
    salt and ground black pepper to taste
    2 TBS olive oil
    2 onions sliced in strips
    2 parsley roots, peeled and sliced into rounds
    (opt. 1 TBS crushed coriander seeds & 1 tsp cumin – I didn’t use)
    2 cups beef stock or water
    6 artichoke hearts, cut in quarters (I use frozen, but there are cans)
    (opt. spinach leaves for garnish – didn’t use)

    Spice your beef cubes with salt and pepper. In a large pot, brown the cubes in olive oil and then remove from pot. In same pot, brown the onion strips. Add parsley root and optional seasonings. Add browned beef cubes and mix. Add stock/water just to cover the beef and no more and bring to a boil. Cook at a low simmer with lid on for 2 hours. Add artichoke hearts and continue to cook another 45 minutes. Just before serving you can add spinach leaves(opt).

  22. This looks so delicious. I will definitely start following you, this is amazing.

  23. I just love your blog! Great recipes. Keep up the good work!

  24. Stephanie

    Any chance you’ve perfected that GF matzos? I’d love to get that recipe if you’ve gotten it to the place where it can be shared.

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